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Download e-book for iPad: An introduction to HDLs for simulation and synthesis (VHDL) by Pellerin D.

By Pellerin D.

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Extra resources for An introduction to HDLs for simulation and synthesis (VHDL)

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An example will follow to clear up this. • async_write(stream, buffer [, completion], handler): This function asynchronously writes to a stream. The meaning of the arguments is similar to async_read. • read(stream, buffer [, completion]): This function synchronously reads from a stream. The meaning of the arguments is similar to async_read. • write(stream, buffer [, completion]): This function synchronously writes to a stream. The meaning of the arguments is similar to async_read: °° async_read(stream, stream_buffer [, completion], handler) °° async_write(strean, stream_buffer [, completion], handler) °° write(stream, stream_buffer [, completion]) °° read(stream, stream_buffer [, completion]) First, note that instead of socket, the first argument is a stream.

You don't access them directly, you use the buffer() function. Suffice to say, you can wrap any of the following into a buffer() function: • A char[] const array • A void* pointer and size in characters • An std::string string • An POD[] const array (POD stands for plain old data, meaning, constructor and destructor do nothing) • An std::vector array of any POD • A boost::array array of any POD • An std::array array of any POD The following code works: struct pod_sample { int i; long l; char c; }; ...

This is extremely easy for synchronous operations; of course, the buff will outlive both receive and send: char buff[512]; ... Asio Fundamentals This is not so straightforward for asynchronous operations, as given in the following code snippet: // very bad code ... void on_read(const boost::system::error_code & err, std::size_t read_ bytes) { ... async_receive(buffer(buff), on_read); } After the call to async_receive(), buff will go out of scope, thus its memory will be deallocated. When we're about to actually receive some data on the socket, we'll copy them into memory we don't own anymore; it could either be deallocated, or reallocated by some other code for some other data, thus, corrupting memory.

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An introduction to HDLs for simulation and synthesis (VHDL) by Pellerin D.


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